Cancer bio-repository

Document Type: Review Article

Authors

1 Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical

2 Colorectal Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

3 Autophagy Research center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, shiraz, Iran.

Abstract

Background: Cancer research is highly dependent of large amount of data and high quality samples which can be provided by networks to enable large-scale multi-center research projects. Biologic materials, such as blood, tissue samples, DNA, body fluids and the related data obtained in cohorts and clinical trials are valuable sources for research which should be managed by policies and standard operating procedures as biorepositories or biobanks.
Methods and evidence acquisition: The authors investigated and summarized pubmed database articles using biobanks and describing the policies.
Conclusion: biobanking as a young discipline in different countries needs new technologies, standards and harmonization. In this review article, we have an overview on biorepository, cancer biobanking and the emerging registry in Iran.
Background: Cancer research is highly dependent of large amount of data and high quality samples which can be provided by networks to enable large-scale multi-center research projects. Biologic materials, such as blood, tissue samples, DNA, body fluids and the related data obtained in cohorts and clinical trials are valuable sources for research which should be managed by policies and standard operating procedures as biorepositories or biobanks.
Methods and evidence acquisition: The authors investigated and summarized pubmed database articles using biobanks and describing the policies.
Conclusion: biobanking as a young discipline in different countries needs new technologies, standards and harmonization. In this review article, we have an overview on biorepository, cancer biobanking and the emerging registry in Iran.

Keywords


1.            Kauffmann F, Cambon-Thomsen A. Tracing biological collections: between books and clinical trials. Jama. 2008;299(19):2316-8.
2.            Knoppers BM, Saginur M. Bio-banking. The Cambridge Textbook of Bioethics. 2008:166-73.
3.            Riegman PH, Morente MM, Betsou F, De Blasio P, Geary P. Biobanking for better healthcare. Molecular Oncology. 2008;2(3):213-22.
4.            Mohamadkhani A, Poustchi H. Repository of human blood derivative biospecimens in biobank: technical implications. Middle East journal of digestive diseases. 2015;7(2):61.
5.            Gottweis H, Zatloukal K. Biobank governance: trends and perspectives. Pathobiology. 2007;74(4):206-11.
6.            Yuille M, Van Ommen G-J, Bréchot C, Cambon-Thomsen A, Dagher G, Landegren U, et al. Biobanking for europe. Briefings in bioinformatics. 2007;9(1):14-24.
7.            Vaught JB, Caboux E, Hainaut P. International efforts to develop biospecimen best practices. Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention Biomarkers. 2010;19(4):912-5.
8.            Hewitt RE. Biobanking: the foundation of personalized medicine. Current opinion in oncology. 2011;23(1):112-9.
9.            Baird CP. Maximizing the utility of the serum repository with current technologies and recommendations to meet future needs: report of the technical panel. Military medicine. 2015;180(suppl_10):25-33.
10.          Hainaut P, Caboux E, Bevilacqua G, Bosman F, Dassesse T, Hoefler H, et al. Pathology as the cornerstone of human tissue banking: European consensus expert group report. Biopreservation and biobanking. 2009;7(3):157-60.
11.          Bevilacqua G, Bosman F, Dassesse T, Höfler H, Janin A, Langer R, et al. The role of the pathologist in tissue banking: European Consensus Expert Group Report. Springer; 2010.
12.          Campbell PT, Deka A, Briggs P, Cicek M, Farris AB, Gaudet MM, et al. Establishment of the cancer prevention study II nutrition cohort colorectal tissue repository. AACR; 2014.
13.          Amirkhah R, Naderi-Meshkin H, Mirahmadi M, Allahyari A, Sharifi HR. Cancer statistics in Iran: Towards finding priority for prevention and treatment. Cancer Press. 2017;3(2):27-38.
14.          van de Wetering M, Francies HE, Francis JM, Bounova G, Iorio F, Pronk A, et al. Prospective derivation of a living organoid biobank of colorectal cancer patients. Cell. 2015;161(4):933-45.
15.          Bradbury KE, Murphy N, Key TJ. Diet and colorectal cancer in UK Biobank: a prospective study. International journal of epidemiology. 2019.
16.          Hillreiner A, Baumeister SE, Sedlmeier AM, Finger JD, Schlitt HJ, Leitzmann MF. Association between cardiorespiratory fitness and colorectal cancer in the UK Biobank. European journal of epidemiology. 2019:1-13.
17.          Mullins CS, Micheel B, Matschos S, Leuchter M, Bürtin F, Krohn M, et al. Integrated biobanking and tumor model establishment of human colorectal carcinoma provides excellent tools for preclinical research. Cancers. 2019;11(10):1520.
18.          Manders P, Vos J, de Voer RM, Hest L, Sijmons R, Hoge CV, et al. Parelsnoer institute biobank hereditary colorectal cancer: A joint infrastructure for patient data and biomaterial on hereditary colorectal cancer in the Netherlands. Open Journal of Bioresources. 2019;6.
19.          Casson PR, Krawetz SA, Diamond MP, Zhang H, Legro RS, Schlaff WD, et al. Proactively establishing a biologic specimens repository for large clinical trials: an idea whose time has come. Systems biology in reproductive medicine. 2011;57(5):217-21.
20.          Kheradmand M, Moosazadeh M, Saeedi M, Poustchi H, Eghtesad S, Esmaeili R, et al. Tabari Cohort Profile and Preliminary Results in Urban Areas and Mountainous Regions of Mazandaran, Iran. Archives of Iranian medicine. 2019;22(6):279-85.
21.          Khoshdel A, Alimohammadi M, Sepandi M, Alimohamadi Y, Jalali P, Janani M. Spatio-temporal analysis of colorectal cancer using a geographic information system in the Iranian military community during the period 2007–2016. Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps. 2019:jramc-2018-001151.